Weekly Gwinnett Staff Picks: Centerville Branch

American Girls by Alison Umminger

Anna has had a miserable year. Everything feels wrong with her life. And rather than stay and face the mess, she steals a credit card and books herself a seat on the first flight out of town to Los Angeles, to crash with her sister. But soon after she lands, cold reality soon dawns on her: Hollywood isn’t the escape she needs. She is trapped in a town full of lost souls and wannabes, with no friends, no cash and no return ticket.

Recommended by: Lyric A.

 

 

 

 

State of Fear by Michael Crichton

In Paris, a graduate student in a secret laboratory reveals a powerful new technology to a beautiful and mysterious woman. A few hours later, the student is drugged and dumped in a river. Radical environmental terrorists are launching a fanatical campaign and the very future of the world they seek to protect may be at stake. Only MIT scientist and federal agent John Kenner can stop the deadly plot before the terrifying consequences are realized and millions die.

Recommended by: Darrin A.

 

 

 

 

 

A History of the World in 100 Objects by Neil MacGregorNeil

MacGregor’s radio series ‘AHistoryoftheWorldin100Objects‘ has been a unique event that has set a benchmark for public service broadcasting inthe UK and across theworld. This book is the tie-in to that event, reproducing the scripts describing theobjectsthat made us who we are.

Recommended by: Morgan B.

 

 

 

 

 

As the Crow Flies by Craig Johnson

The Gotham underworld is thrown into turmoil as its crimelords are slipping into a rabid and murderous frenzy. Is it coincidence or part of an elaborate and sinister power play? One thing’s for sure: the machinations of the Scarecrow and the Penguin will have Batman hard- pressed to restore order Ages 12+.

Recommended by: Sandy S.

 

 

 

 

 

A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled HosseiniBorn

A generation apart and with very different ideas about love and family, Mariam and Laila are two women brought jarringly together by war, by loss and by fate. As they endure the ever escalating dangers around them-in their home as well as in the streets of Kabul-they come to form a bond that makes them both sisters and mother-daughter to each other, and that will ultimately alter the course not just of their own lives but of the next generation.

Recommended by: Leigh S.